Lorali Grant is a new teacher at Modo Yoga Bedford.

Modo Voices: Lorali finds self-worth by opening up about her past

 

The strength of the amazing people in the Modo Yoga community, as individuals and together as a family, will never cease to amaze.

Lorali’s heartbreaking story is truly one of resilience, perseverance and all-round girl power.

READ MORE: Modo Voices: Karl learns to love all his colours

Her bravery rings true as she shares her story while in Montreal, Can., for the Modo Yoga teacher training.

“Growing up, my mom always knew how to cut the deepest. My weight was my weakest point.

In my last year of high school, she put me on diet so I would look good for grad, weighing all my food and if I didn’t lose enough weight she would call me a ‘fat pig.’

All of my worth was wrapped up in my family’s approval, always striving to be loved by them.

The only time they ever said they were proud of me was when I lost weight.

And while my mom verbally abused me during the day, I was sexually abused by my stepdad while she was at night school.

I escaped by joining the military. It was the easiest way out. I haven’t spoken to them since.

It wasn’t until two years after that I was diagnosed with bulimia and major depressive disorder.

Even with weekly therapy and medication, I still continued to struggle.

In 2005, I was deployed to Afghanistan for seven months. The experience changed my life. After suffering an injury, I came home traumatized, broken and more confused than ever, questioning everything in my life.

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“Growing up, my mom always knew how to cut the deepest. My weight was my weakest point. In my last year of high school, she put me on diet so I would look good for grad, weighing all my food and if I didn’t lose enough weight she would call me “a fat pig.” All of my worth was wrapped up in my family’s approval, always striving to be loved by them. The only time they ever said they were proud of me was when I lost weight. And while my mom verbally abused me during the day, I was sexually abused by my stepdad while she was at night school. I escaped by joining the military. It was the easiest way out. I haven’t spoken to them since. It wasn’t until 2 years after that I was diagnosed with Bulimia and a Major Depressive Disorder. Even with weekly therapy and medication, I still continued to struggle. In 2005, I was deployed to Afghanistan for 7 months. The experience changed my life. After suffering an injury, I came home traumatized, broken and more confused than ever, questioning everything in my life. My eating disorder got so bad that I was hospitalized for 14 weeks. I was also diagnosed with Generalize Anxiety Disorder (Fear Specific) and C-PTSD. When I was medically released from the military, I struggled to find a sense of purpose. My neighbour invited me to a Modo class and I loved every minute of it. The accessibility made all the difference… there were people of every age, shape and size in the class. I had found my home. I slowly stopped pushing people out of my life and began to show compassion for myself. I did my first 30 Day Challenge and was hooked. It was part of my self-care, my therapy. It helped me come back to my body in all the right ways. I appreciated the strength in my body and slowly began to even like parts of myself. I now have passion and drive to make each day matter. Modo helped give me back my life. If I can help just one person to experience a bit of the Modo magic, I will know it was all worth it!” —@loralig, @modoyogabedford #ModoVoices

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My eating disorder got so bad that I was hospitalized for 14 weeks. I was also diagnosed with generalize anxiety disorder (fear specific) and C-PTSD.

When I was medically released from the military, I struggled to find a sense of purpose. My neighbour invited me to a Modo class and I loved every minute of it.

The accessibility made all the difference. There were people of every age, shape and size in the class. I had found my home.

I slowly stopped pushing people out of my life and began to show compassion for myself.

I did my first 30-day challenge and was hooked. It was part of my self-care, my therapy. It helped me come back to my body in all the right ways.

I appreciated the strength in my body and slowly began to like parts of myself.

I now have passion and drive to make each day matter. Modo helped give me back my life. If I can help just one person to experience a bit of the Modo magic, I will know it was all worth it.”

Modo Voices shares the stories of students and teachers across the Modo community.  Some came to Modo through friends, others took the road less travelled as they searched for answers to enliven their life, connect deeper with themselves and their community or bravely face battles with depression, anxiety, injury or prejudice. No matter how they got here, we are Modo Yoga.