The Source Of Your Care | Letter from the Director | November 2019

THE SOURCE OF OUR CARE

In the recently published Day of Pause Official Info Video, it is acknowledged how, in some way, every single one of us cares. Considering the myriad of ways we all show up in the world (or don’t), it can be fascinating to consider from where our care is sourced. To care is to expend energy, and whether it’s to put food in our mouth, to allow space for our next inhale, or simply to watch our next thought appear, some amount of energy is required. When it comes to where to effectively direct our care in a given moment, it, of course, depends on our circumstances. 

If our most basic human needs are not being met, typically our care will automatically direct us toward somehow finding the necessary resources that fill these needs. This can be recognized as a pure care, in that it’s the human need in us that guides us toward survival. It’s said that when our core needs are met in a given moment, and we’re aware of it, gratitude arises. The clarity created by that combination of awareness and gratitude allows us to continue to direct our care more purely. Ultimately, care is synonymous with actions carried out for the greater good, as humans are hard-wired for connection. In this stream, care becomes more effortless and allows our spirit to more easily show itself.

Our lack of awareness toward the immediate resources that support us in a given moment is what taints our care. When we attach to the thoughts that we are lacking in some way, we source our care more from fear, resentment and/or obligation, impeding our energetic flow. This is the self-induced dampening of our spirit, and an important element of our yoga practice when it comes to challenging ourselves to awaken and find our more authentic care.

The clarity that allows us to see the abundance in our lives is what also allows for our care to move with the least amount of effort, leading to more efficient use of our energy. Consider, though, that the majority of us are unable (or too afraid) to acknowledge how rich we are, for to do so is to want for nothing, and the very thought of this can make our nervous systems go haywire, creating a mental/physical discomfort that can feel unbearable.

Both science and spirit tell us that the necessary technology and resources are already here if we can slow down enough to notice our existing abundance. This noticing is what will enable us to co-exist in such a way that we hold one another, more freely expressing our innate care for the rest of humanity. Can we allow our individual and collective nervous system to relax and trust, so that it may do less while still functioning properly, if not better? Can we draw our egos further from fear—trusting that we’ll be safe to begin sharing more of what we already have? Where will we allow our true care to take us? Is this not the essence of yoga? Is this not the practice of being fully human?

See you in the practice room,

Don